Crimestoppers and Police target stolen property

A joint campaign started on 9 July aimed at disrupting the trade in stolen property by encouraging people to pass on information anonymously to Crimestoppers.

The campaign, which is a joint initiative with New Zealand Police, Trade Me and The Radio Network, is aimed at encouraging people who have information on the stolen property trade to pass on what they know anonymously through Crimestoppers.

It will run until the end of October 2012 in Northland, Auckland, Waikato, Palmerston North and Kapiti Mana.

Crimestoppers Chief Executive Lou Gardiner says he hopes the campaign will increase the number of calls to Crimestoppers about stolen property.

“The more calls we get, the more useful information we can pass on to the police. They can build that information into their intelligence picture to help detect and prevent more burglary, shoplifting, vehicle crime and receiving.

“So I’m encouraging anyone who for whatever reason knows something about the activities of these thieves and receivers but doesn’t want to talk to the police directly, to contact Crimestoppers. Anonymity is guaranteed – no-one will ever know who passed on the information.”

Mr Gardiner is also asking the public to play their part in disrupting the stolen property trade by being more vigilant if they’re offered cheap goods.

“Law abiding people can inadvertently provide a market for stolen items by not checking out where items have come from.

“I’m talking about TVs, laptops, phones, cars or car parts, garage and garden equipment and jewellery. If you’re offered anything like this at well below market value, then you need to find out where it’s come from. Is the person selling it to you the owner?”

Asking direct questions, not buying if in doubt and checking out websites like www.police.govt.nz/stolen/vehicles are all good ways of ascertaining how bona fide such offers are, Mr Gardiner says.

“And of course, the police would like to hear about it. But if you’d rather remain anonymous, then call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 or use the secure online form.”